FLOW concert continued...

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FLOW concert continued…

Here is the next installation of the FLOW concert, featuring mesmerizing performances by Guy Buttery, Ronan Skillen and Kyla- Rose Smith set to the underwater landscapes of the Two Oceans Aquarium.

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Showering for Glory

Do the Green Thing is back with a hilarious mini documentary about the forgotten sport of Short Sharp Showers.

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Umbrella’s to Harvest rainwater

Emotive video from India, put a unique spin on rainwater harvesting and shows how an upside down umbrella can become a personal rain catcher. The film seeks to deliver a simple message: Rain water belongs to each of us and that we should collect and share. Below are some pics of more umbrella harvesters.

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TED x Seapoint – Who Moved my Sushi?

This past weekend I was lucky enough to attend TEDx Seapoint – Who Moved my Sushi?  It was a truly inspiring event that brought light to the plight of our oceans (over 80% of the oceans fisheries are currently over-exploited) and shared solutions to protect and restore our marine resources. The speakers were change-makers from all walks of life – from big wave riders and free divers to filmmakers, artists, photographers and marine biologists.  As the day progressed a common theme began to emerge – that people will only conserve what they know and love and that media has a huge role to play in creating these connections. So let’s us all share our stories of water, for it is the element that connects us…

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FLOW Concert – Live at the Aquarium

I celebration of World Water Day, we have created a video of the Flow – For Love Of Water SA launch concert! Flow is a South African water awareness campaign that aims to celebrate and foster a love of water and to highlight water related issues. The video features top SA musicians. Zolani Mahola & Kyla Rose-Smith of Freshlyground, Guy Buttery, Ronan Skillen, and Donovan Copley (Hot Water) and Hanli Prinsloo (SA Freediving Champion) in a eerie performance in the shark tank!.

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Water Wars

The year is 2030, and the effects of climate change are felt across the world. 47 per cent of the world’s population live in areas of high water stress.

In South Africa, a few remaining farmers fight to defend the last reservoirs of this scarce resource and protect our future…

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Playpumps revisited – appropriate technology?

Last week we posted an article on the PlayPump – which on the surface looks like a wonderful innovation to alleviate access to water. However, a recent research shows that in reality there are many problems with the design, questioning what is truly appropriate technology. In this video Ralph Borland gives a talk on ‘The problem with the PlayPump’ at IGNITE at the Science Gallery tent in Mindfield, at The Electric Picnic in September 2011. Read more for a longer version.

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Playpumps – harnessing the power of play

Playpumps are a low tech solution to one of Africa’s greatest challenges – access to clean drinking water. This life changing invention, utilizes human power – harnessing the power of play to pump water. As children play on a specially designed merry-go-round, borehole water is pumped into and stored in a 2,500 litre tank, where it can be accessed when needed.

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“For Love of Water” – the song

It is World Water and Cape Town is beating to the sound of a gentle summer rain! In the spirit of this celebration of water, life and planet a group of International and South African artists (Zolani Mahola, Loyiso Bala, Stef Bos – to name a few) have gathered to create an original piece of music called ‘For Love Of Water’.

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The Story of Bottled Water

The Story of Bottled Water, releasing March 22, 2010 on storyofbottledwater.org, employs the Story of Stuff style to tell the story of manufactured demand—how Americans to buy more than half a billion bottles of water every week when it already flows from the tap. Over seven minutes, the film explores the bottled water industry’s attacks on tap water and its use of seductive, environmental-themed advertising to cover up the mountains of plastic waste it produces. The film concludes with a call to ‘take back the tap,’ not only by making a personal commitment to avoid bottled water, but by supporting investments in clean, available tap water for all.

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